38 women share their stories of vile sexual harassment at the hands of an obscure filmmaker

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The Harvey Weinsteins of the world aren’t always household names. Frequently, in fact, they’re nothing of the sort.

So it is with James Toback, a longtime (and relatively obscure) filmmaker who is now facing allegations of sexual harassment leveled by 38 different women, as a Los Angeles Times investigation reveals. And much like Weinstein, Toback’s deplorable behavior has been an open secret for decades.

He was the subject of an extensive feature in a 1989 issue Spy Magazine, which chronicled firsthand accounts from an assortment of (anonymous) women. More recently, his bad behavior was highlighted in four different Gawker stories, published between 2008 and 2012. Read more…

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38 women share their stories of vile sexual harassment at the hands of an obscure filmmaker

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The Harvey Weinsteins of the world aren’t always household names. Frequently, in fact, they’re nothing of the sort.

So it is with James Toback, a longtime (and relatively obscure) filmmaker who is now facing allegations of sexual harassment leveled by 38 different women, as a Los Angeles Times investigation reveals. And much like Weinstein, Toback’s deplorable behavior has been an open secret for decades.

He was the subject of an extensive feature in a 1989 issue Spy Magazine, which chronicled firsthand accounts from an assortment of (anonymous) women. More recently, his bad behavior was highlighted in four different Gawker stories, published between 2008 and 2012. Read more…

More about Entertainment, Sexual Harassment, James Toback, Entertainment, and Celebrities

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How to actually do stuff on your phone while you're listening to music on YouTube

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YouTube is meant for video, but as most everyone has figured out by now, it’s also great for music. You can find just about every deep cut imaginable on the platform — but listening to the tunes on the mobile app isn’t always the most enjoyable experience. 

The YouTube app has one particularly egregious flaw for listeners: Playback is only available when the app is front and center on a user’s screen, and it stops when you shift your attentions elsewhere and open another. 

I’m one of those weirdos who refuses to embrace streaming, so I turn to YouTube for one-off mobile jams. The playback problem is really grating — nothing’s worse than losing all other functions of my phone for the full 5:20 of Danny Brown’s Really Doe when I’m at the gym.  Read more…

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Vivid photos offer a record of a diverse Massachusetts community

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c. 1904

Portrait of the Thomas A. and Margaret Dillon Family. Virginia-born coachman Thomas A. Dillon and his wife, Margaret, a domestic servant and native of Newton, Massachusetts, pose in the parlor of their home at 4 Dewey Street with children Thomas, Margaret, and Mary. A poster on the wall commemorates President Theodore Roosevelt’s visit to the Worcester Agricultural Fair in 1902.

Image: William Bullard, courtesy of Frank Morrill, Clark University and Worcester Art Museum

Born and raised in the city of Worcester, Massachusetts, William Bullard worked as a photographer without a studio, visiting clients around the town with his camera strapped to his bicycle. Read more…

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Designer of the Week: Johnross Post

[Call for entries: HOW Logo Design Awards]


Whether he’s pulling inspiration from Japanese candy packaging, executing fun side projects with friends or pondering his next “random” creative challenge, Designer of the Week Johnross Post certainly knows how to keep things interesting. Explore his bold work below.

Johnross PostName: Johnross Post

Firm: art director at DDB Chicago

Location: Chicago

Website: johnrosspost.com / Instagram: @Jr_Pc_ 

Design school attended: School of Visual Arts

How would you describe your work?

I’ve never made a deliberate effort to develop a specific style; I try to let the project dictate the approach I take, but I’d say my work tends to be bold, colorful and loud. I’ve always been more into things that are kinda chaotic versus things that are too clean or orderly. I also try to infuse humor in my work whenever I can. 

Where do you find inspiration?

I try and allow myself to be inspired by as many different things as I can, specifically things outside the world of design and advertising. I love comic books; I think from a color and typographical standpoint there’s nothing more impressive. If you look back at the books from like the 60s and 70s, they were doing all that little dialog type by hand, which is just crazy.

Probably the most random place I recently started pulling inspiration from was Japanese candy packaging. I just bought a bunch of Japanese candy off eBay, and the typography is BONKERS. I don’t know if it’s because I can’t actually read it and because of that I’m just looking at the forms, but it’s just mind-blowing. And the colors, man, it’s crazy.

Who are some of your favorite designers or artists?

So many. Mike McQuade is probably my favorite right now; his stuff is so good. I also like the work of Will Bryant, Neil Kellerhouse, Dark Igloo, Sagmeister & Walsh, Hort, Leta Sobierajskii, Paul Sahre, The Daniels, Dan Blackman, GrandArmy, Craig Ward, FAILE, Cody Hudson, Ryan Duggan, Alvin Diec, Oliver Munday, Jesse Draxler, Tadanori Yokoo. The list goes on. There are just so many people doing amazing work right now.

work by Johnross PostValidation is a unisex eau-de-parfum fragrance for the overworked and underappreciated. Crafted specifically for those in creative, tech and advertising.

work by Johnross Post

Do you have a favorite among all the projects you’ve worked on?

I think one of my favorite projects is a project called Validation that I did with my buddy Hassan S. Ali, who is an amazing creative at The Onion. It came from the idea that at one point or another, everyone who works in the design, advertising and tech fields has felt underappreciated. We thought it would be funny to create something that could instantly deliver that feeling of validation. Not only did we set out to build a brand from scratch, but it was in a category that neither of us really knew anything about. We found a guy to make the fragrance for us, we designed packaging, collateral and a website all in like two months. It was crazy. It was such a good feeling to actually take a project from start to finish, and it taught me that if you have a good partner, focus, and you do your research you can basically make anything happen.

work by johnross post

 

Is there a project that stands out to you as having been the biggest challenge of your career so far?

They all present their own unique challenges. I think early on the work I did that was client-driven, like the Jack work that’s in my book, was really challenging because I was learning how to work in an agency environment and with a client. Now my self-initiated work is more challenging in a lot of ways because I think I set a pretty high bar for myself. I’m my own harshest critic most of the time. 

work by johnross post

What do you hope to accomplish in the future?

My main focus is always growing as a creative. I’d love to open my own shop, but I’d be happy if I could amass just an insanely eclectic body of work. I’d love to write a movie or tv show, get into directing music videos, brand and design restaurants and spaces, do packaging for hip-hop albums, design Hawaiian shirts, just all sorts of random things. I think by having such a broad range of interests and ambitions the future’s hopefully gonna be pretty interesting.

work by johnross post

What’s your best advice for designers today?

  1. Make the logo bigger. JK, that’s terrible advice.
  2. Be diverse with everything. Where you pull your inspiration from, the projects you choose, the mediums you work in. I think it makes you a more well-rounded designer.
  3. Have an opinion, and let it guide your work.
  4. Do projects that you want to do. No matter how silly, weird or irrelevant they seem. My friend Alf has a project where he Photoshop’s Blake Griffin dunking over random things. It’s called Blake Griffin Dunks. Every creative director who has looked at it thinks it’s amazing. Do weird stuff like that.
  5. The best advice I ever received was to not be afraid to ask for things. Whether it’s a raise, a promotion or an opportunity. If you ask for something you might get it. ¯_(ツ)_/¯

work by johnross post


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The post Designer of the Week: Johnross Post appeared first on Print Magazine.

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How creepy YouTube videos trick kids into watching violent videos

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The internet will inevitably steal the soul of every child at some point as he or she grows up, but some are speeding the process along by manipulating YouTube’s powerful algorithm.

Creepy, weird, and violent clips intended for kids pop up frequently on YouTube and even YouTube Kids, its family-friendly app designed for children that launched in 2015. And YouTube’s policy is to be mostly hands off — until someone complains.

Take for example the video embedded below that showed up on both YouTube and the Kids app: You press play and at first your screen fills with recognizable cartoon characters and cheesy music — but things take a drastic turn when Elsa and Spider-Man arm themselves with automatic weapons. Read more…

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If you like to travel, then it's worth investing in a versatile charging station like this one

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Just to let you know, if you buy something featured here, Mashable might earn an affiliate commission.

If you’ve done any international traveling, you probably already know that not all charging solutions are created equal. There are the ones that come with converters and outlet adapters…and that thing you haven’t quite figured out yet. Then there are the ones with different outlet adapters depending on where you’re going (turns out those are super easy to lose in a suitcase).

But the Twist Plus+ World Charging Station is a welcome departure from the typical traveling woes. All you need is the Twist to charge your devices — no converters and no random cords (seriously, where do they even come from?) It has a universal AC power outlet, so you can plug it in anywhere when you’re traveling internationally. Once it’s plugged in, just plug in your devices — it’s got four USB ports and a port specifically for your MacBook, so you don’t need to go searching for outlets wherever you’re staying. The best part? It’s compact—so it doesn’t need its own suitcase. Read more…

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